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December 14th, 2023

Northeast High School Multi-Agency Disaster Relief Center

The Northeast High School Multi-Agency Disaster Relief Center is closing at 2 p.m. on Monday, December 18. Donations that remain on-site will be distributed to local agencies and the coordinated Clarksville-Montgomery County warehouse space.

The Red Cross Shelter is moving from Northeast High School to Park Lane Church of the Nazarene at 225 Cunningham Lane at 2 p.m. on Monday, December 18. You can access the free Red Cross Emergency app or call 1-800-RED CROSS (800-733-2767) and select the disaster option for more information about resources from the Red Cross.

FEMA has moved to the Clarksville-Montgomery County Public Library at 350 Pageant Ln #501. Please call 1-800-621-3362 or visit www.disasterassistance.gov for more information.

World Central Kitchen and Macedonian Missionary Service will serve their last meals at Northeast High today. We appreciate both of these incredible partners for coming to Clarksville-Montgomery County to serve our community. For more information on World Central Kitchen, visit www.wck.org. For more information on Macedonian Missionary Service, visit www.macedonianms.org.

Since Saturday, December 9, over 500 CMCSS employee volunteers and numerous partners have been able to serve thousands of community members in need with tens of thousands of meals, donations, and services. As we close operations at Northeast High, numerous community agencies will continue to need your support over the coming days, weeks, and months. Please visit the City of Clarksville or Montgomery County Government websites and click the “Tornado Information” banners for more information on how you can support.

Thank you, Clarksville-Montgomery County, for showing the world the true meanings of community, empathy, love, and service!


September 20th, 2023

CMCSS School Board Presents the Point of Pride Awards

The CMCSS School Board presented two Point of Pride awards during the September 19 meeting.

Ms. Allison Levy is an educator at Montgomery Central High School who was recently selected as a Claes Nobel Educator of Distinction by The National Society of High School Scholars. She was nominated by a student for her outstanding dedication and commitment to excellence as an educator. This national honor recognizes exemplary educators whose passion and devotion inspire their students to grow and develop as scholars, leaders, and citizens. She is now also eligible to compete for The National Society of High School Scholars’ Educator of the Year award. Congratulations, Ms. Levy!

First Sergeant Darall Luckett is a JROTC Instructor at West Creek High School. Last year, he led his cadets to several national honors. First Sergeant Luckett was selected as the 7th Brigade’s Army Instructor of the Year for the 2022-2023 school year. The 7th Brigade is comprised of programs in Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Of all the Army Instructors in these five states, First Sergeant Luckett was selected as the Instructor of the Year for his exceptional dedication and leadership capabilities to his cadets and colleagues. Congratulations, First Sergeant Luckett!


July 25th, 2023

CMCSS Administrator Announcements for July 2023

CMCSS made the following administrator announcements in July 2023.

Director of Instruction and Curriculum 9-12

Dr. Becky Padgett has been selected as the Director of Instruction and Curriculum 9-12. She has served as an assistant principal at Rossview High School since 2017. Dr. Padgett began her career with CMCSS in 2005 and has previously served as an English teacher, AVID coordinator and teacher, academic coach, and head women’s basketball coach. Before beginning her career with CMCSS, Dr. Padgett served as an adjunct professor and women’s basketball coach at the collegiate level. She was named a CMCSS and Rossview High Teacher of the Year, received the Green Apple Award, and was honored as The Leaf-Chronicle’s Girls Basketball Coach of the Year. Dr. Padgett has presented at state and national conferences and has served in several school- and district-level leadership roles, including CMCSS ACT Prep Lead Teacher, TN Department of Education Standards Training Site Operations Manager, and TN Teacher Leader Guidebook Contributor. She earned her Ed.d. in Learning Organizations and Strategic Change from Lipscomb University, M.S. in Health and Human Performance from Austin Peay State University, and B.A. in Communications, Broadcast Journalism from the University of Tennessee at Martin.

ILP-D Coordinator

Ashley Forbis has been selected as the District’s ILP-D Coordinator. In this role, she will support the ongoing development and improvement of Individualized Learning Plans (ILP) for students with characteristics of dyslexia. Forbis has served as an ELA Consulting Teacher since 2018. She began her career with CMCSS in 2004 as a classroom teacher and also served for three years as an academic coach. During her nearly 20-year career in public education, Forbis has led numerous initiatives and professional development efforts to support literacy. She completed extensive training to earn a Certified Academic Language Therapist (CALT) license and has focused on providing specialized and intensive support for students with dyslexia. Forbis earned her M.S. in Education from Nova Southeastern University and B.S. in Elementary Education from Austin Peay State University.

Liberty Elementary Assistant Principal

Kelly Hall has been selected as an assistant principal at Liberty Elementary School. Hall has served as a First-Grade Multi-Classroom Leader at Minglewood Elementary School since 2019. She began her career in CMCSS in 2006 and has served as a special education resource assistant, classroom teacher, and K-2 RLA lead teacher, serving at East Montgomery, Pisgah, and Minglewood elementary schools. Additionally, she served as a childcare teacher and caregiver for three years and has been a senior youth pastor since 2009. Hall has served on school and district-level curriculum and assessment development teams and has earned several Green Apple Awards. She earned her M.A. in Administration from Austin Peay State University, B.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies from Western Governors University, and B.L.A. from the University of South Carolina. Hall completed the CMCSS Teacher Leader Academy, CMCSS Leadership Development Course, and the APSU Aspiring Assistant Principal Program.

Montgomery Central High School Assistant Principal

Jessica Drudy has been selected as a half-time assistant principal at Montgomery Central High School. Drudy currently serves as an academic coach at the school. She began her career with CMCSS in 2014 as a teacher and soccer coach and has served at both Kenwood and Montgomery Central high schools. Additionally, she has served as a National Math and Science Initiative (NMSI) Educational Coach since 2020. Drudy was named a CMCSS Teacher of the Year district finalist, earned the Mike Brown Award of Excellence, and was a Green Apple Award recipient and district finalist. She has served in numerous school- and district-level leadership roles, including Student Support and Testing Coordinator, Site-Based Induction Specialist, and CMCSS’ English III lead teacher. Drudy earned her Ed.S. in Educational Leadership from Arkansas State University and her M.S.Ed. in Interdisciplinary English and B.S.Ed. in Secondary English from the University of Tennessee at Martin. She is a graduate of the CMCSS Aspiring Administrators Academy and completed the CMCSS Teacher Leader Academy.

Rossview High School Assistant Principal

Dr. Lauren McCurdy, who was previously selected as an assistant principal at Kirkwood and Rossview middle schools, will remain at Rossview High School as an assistant principal. She has 15 years of teaching experience at Rossview High and in Trigg County. Dr. McCurdy has served in several school- and district-level leadership roles, and she graduated from the CMCSS Aspiring Administrators Academy in 2019. She earned her Ed.D. in Leadership and Professional Practice, Ed.S. in Accountability and Instructional Leadership, and M.Ed. in Educational Leadership from Trevecca Nazarene University and her B.S. in Business Administration from the University of Virginia’s College at Wise.


October 19th, 2022

School Board Recognizes Point of Pride Students in October

During the October 18, 2022, school board formal meeting, two CMCSS students were recognized with Point of Pride distinctions.

male student award

Jacob Whittinghill, Clarksville High School

The College Board recognized Jacob Whittinghill from Clarksville High School for receiving a perfect score on an Advanced Placement (AP) exam. Jacob’s AP 2-D Art and Design exam was so superior that it fell into a select category. Jacob received the top score and was only one of 197 students in the world to earn every point possible on the exam, receiving the maximum score on each portion. We applaud Jacob’s hard work and his teacher for helping him excel. Congratulations, Jacob!

student point of pride

Olivia Davis, Montgomery Central High School

Olivia Davis from Montgomery Central High School earned academic honors from the College Board National Recognition Programs. The National Recognition Programs grant underrepresented students from all 50 states with academic honors. To be eligible to apply, students must have a GPA of 3.5 or higher and have excelled on the college entrance exams, or earned a score of 3 or higher on two or more AP Exams; and are African American or Black, Hispanic American or Latinx, Indigenous, and/or attend school in a rural area or small town. Congratulations, Olivia!


100% Graduation November 3rd, 2021

Be a tnAchieves Mentor – Applications Now Open

Class of 2022 tnAchieves mentor recruitment is underway!

Begin the process of becoming a tnAchieves mentor by visiting the tnAchieves website. Applications are available for new and returning mentors.

After completing a mentor application/renewal, you will receive a confirmation email with the next steps. After applying, all tnAchieves mentors must complete mentor training to be paired with Class of 2022 TN Promise students. tnAchieves will communicate training details as soon as they are available.

tnAchieves mentors play a critical role in the success of students across the state of Tennessee as they pursue a post-secondary credential. Many students need just a little extra help in navigating the college-going process. tnAchieves mentors provide that support by offering encouragement and personal guidance to students in their community.

What are the responsibilities of a mentor?

tnAchieves Mentors are asked to serve three essential roles for their students from mid-February 2022 through their first semester of college. Mentoring only takes one hour per month, but that one hour can make a significant difference in a student’s life!

Mentors invest 12 hours annually assisting 5-10 high school seniors. tnAchieves has designed the mentor role so that even the busiest executive, parent, or young professional can make a meaningful impact. If you do not have experience working in education, do not worry! All mentors receive online training, a handbook, and support from the tnAchieves staff.

Questions? Email: [email protected]

Learn more at tnAchieves.org.


October 25th, 2021

Voluntary Student Survey Regarding ESSER 3.0 Funding

This week, CMCSS students in grades 6 – 12 will have the opportunity to voluntarily participate in a short one-question survey regarding ESSER 3.0 funding. The question will be a multi-select ranking question. Data collected will provide the district with another avenue of stakeholder feedback.

The question was specifically designed for students and appeared as follows: 

CMCSS expects to receive a lot of money that we can spend on our schools and students. Please rank the items below from 1 to 7 that you would like to see CMCSS spend more money on with these new funds. 1 = I want CMCSS to spend the most money on this, 7 = I want CMCSS to spend the least amount of money on this

  1. Academics and Instruction
  2. Arts (Music/Band, Art Classes)
  3. Improvements to School Buildings
  4. Student Social and Emotional Learning Support
  5. More Technology or Technology Improvements
  6. Tutoring Opportunities 
  7. More Substitute Teachers and Bus Drivers

 

Stakeholders who have questions regarding ESSER 3.0 can contact [email protected].


October 4th, 2021

Volunteer as an Educational Surrogate Parent for a Student with Disabilities

Caring individuals always make a difference in the lives of CMCSS students. The district is actively seeking community members who are able to represent the educational interests of students with disabilities.

All children with disabilities are entitled to a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) under state and federal special education laws. Included in these laws is a mandate for the parents of children with disabilities to have the opportunity to actively participate in the educational decision-making process. Some children with disabilities may not have parents who can fulfill this very important role, leaving their educational planning solely to representatives from their local school system or other agencies. Federal law, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and state rules, regulations and minimum standards require that an individual must be appointed to make decisions regarding the education students with disabilities must receive.

What is a surrogate parent?

A surrogate parent is a volunteer who is appointed by a local education agency to assist children who do not have parents or family members. The surrogate parent has all of the rights and can make all of the special education or early intervention decisions that are usually made by the child’s parents. Surrogate parents can review educational records; request and consent to evaluations and reevaluations; and challenge the recommendations of the education or early intervention agency by requesting informal and formal dispute resolution procedures. A surrogate parent does not have any rights and responsibilities for the child outside of the special education process.

When does a child require a surrogate parent?

A child with a disability requires a surrogate when:

  1. the parent (as defined in § 300.519) or guardian cannot be identified;
  2. the LEA, after reasonable efforts, cannot discover the whereabouts of a parent;
  3. the child is a ward of the State; or
  4. the child is an unaccompanied homeless youth as defined in section 725 (6) of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11434a(6).

What are the responsibilities of a surrogate parent?

The surrogate parent acts as a substitute parent and is given the responsibility of determining the child’s educational experiences. A surrogate parent is not responsible for any financial costs or direct care of the child with disabilities. The surrogate parent represents the child in every step of the education process including identification, evaluation, and educational placement. The Surrogate Parent fulfills the parent role at all Individualized Education Plan (IEP) Team meetings and works to ensure that the child receives FAPE. A surrogate parent is also responsible for keeping confidential all information from the child’s educational, medical, or social services records.

Who can be a surrogate?

Any citizen of the United States of permanent resident who is at least 18 years old and has no conflict of interest concerning the child’s education may serve as an educational surrogate and must be of good moral character. The educational surrogate must act in the best interest of the student he/she represents. Furthermore, an educational surrogate may not be an employee of a public agency providing care, custody, or educational services to the specific child in need of educational surrogate representation.

How much time and money will this commitment take?

Surrogate parents are required to devote approximately three hours to the training provided by Clarksville Montgomery County Schools at least annually. After a student with disabilities is assigned, the educational surrogate reviews the student’s record well enough to understand the student’s needs, strengths, interests as well as their school history. Training is provided free of charge.

If you are interested in attending a training to become a surrogate parent, please email [email protected].


Child Nutrition Department June 9th, 2021

No Cost Curbside Meals for Summer 2021

The USDA approved for CMCSS to continue serving free curbside meal pick-up to all children 18 and under. The USDA stated that these free meals will be available through June 2022, or until funds run out.

Meals are available for all children 18 and under in Montgomery County, including children not enrolled in CMCSS schools.

Curbside meals will be available for pick-up at any of the traditional high school locations on Wednesday, each week, from 10:00 – 11:00 am. Families with multiple children can pick up all meals in one location. 

Children are not required to be present for curbside pick-up. The person picking up meals will need to provide the name of the child(ren) not present.


March 30th, 2021

MCHS Eagle Scout cares for FIT families

Isaiah Shane Brown is a senior at Montgomery Central High School who has a heart for his community. He took the initiative to collect resources and prepare 313 hygiene bags for the Family in Transition office’s local families.
Through the pandemic, Isaiah spent time fundraising and purchasing items to be included in the bags. He asked the community for donations and partnered with local organizations to spread the word.
These bags will be used for FIT students in need across the district, from elementary to high school. The bags have been prepared in sections, with specific items included for elementary children, teen girls, and teen boys.
At times it became difficult to receive donations, but Isaiah never gave up on his mission. Isaiah is a true example of a student who is positively contributing to CMCSS and the community.

February 26th, 2021

2021 Teacher of the Year, MCHS English Teacher Wins New Car

From left: Jessica Drudy, Christina Ploeckelman, Millard House, Victoria McAlman

The Clarksville-Montgomery County Education Foundation hosted its fourth annual Teacher of the Year Awards, sponsored by James Corlew Chevrolet.

“On behalf of the entire James Corlew family, I am humbled and excited to be a part of this expression of respect and appreciation for all the great teachers in our community,” said Jason Blurton, general manager of James Corlew Chevrolet.

While the event wasn’t held in person this year, the Education Foundation and James Corlew broadcasted a live virtual event from the dealership’s showroom where one Teacher walked away with a brand-new Chevrolet Spark.

“The Foundation is forever grateful to James Corlew for supporting the event again this year and allowing us to host the virtual giveaway from their dealership,” said Robin Burton, Executive Director of the CMC Education Foundation. “With all the uncertainties we faced this past year, the Foundation is excited we are continually able to offer support and recognition to our CMCSS teachers, students, staff. None of this would be possible without the continued support of our sponsors and partners.”

The three District Teachers of the Year vying for the car were Jessica Drudy representing grades 9-12 from Montgomery Central High School, Christina Ploeckelman representing grades 5-8 from Richview Middle School, and Victoria McAlman representing grades pre-K-4 from Burt Elementary School.

Drudy, Ploeckelman, and McAlman drew for the order in which they would choose a boxed gift. Two of the boxes contained $500 Visa gift cards, sponsored by the Education Foundation, and the third box held the key to the Chevrolet Spark. Jessica Drudy was the winner of the car.

“It is so humbling,” she said. “To be recognized by your peers at your school is one thing, but to be recognized at the district-level is so humbling.”

In total, 62 teachers were honored as Teachers of the Year for the Clarksville-Montgomery County School System district. Each Teacher received a crystal award recognizing their achievement. Also, since an in-person reception was not an option this year, the Education Foundation provided each Teacher of the Year awardee with a gift certificate to the Choppin’ Block.

WATCH: A video with all the nominated teachers, with comments by their administrators, is available below.

The top three finalists represent three grade-level categories set by the Tennessee Department of Education. They will compete at the regional level in the Tennessee Department of Education Teacher of the Year.

“Our teachers have worked tirelessly this year and persevered. This recognition is a great honor, and I am proud of the work of our educators each day.”

Jessica Drudy, an English Teacher at Montgomery Central High, sits in her new Chevy Spark.